Analog Signal Does Not Die

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DISCOVER CHALLENGE
Analog
Embrace nostalgia and share your analog passions online.

This post story about the analog broadcasting signal is all quite simple. The Federal Communications Commission sold analog broadcasting at auction to various broadcasting corporations for their benefit. The main reason behind this change, because everyone was so infatuated with the near perfect pictures that they get with digital television. The world was supposed to make the big changeover from analog to digital and live happily ever after. The following URL explains a little bit about this analog auction process.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_2008_wireless_spectrum_auction If you continue to read all of this information from the URLs listed below, your mind will be completely boggled by the wording and and by the complication of the process. All of the Philadelphia Lawyers ever born would have trouble sorting through the  superior wording of the awe and confusion found in the foll]owing URLs . Auction 73 generally went as planned by telecommunications analysts. In total, Auction 73 raised $19.592 billion.

MORE MUMBO JUMBO!!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television_transition_in_the_United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short term_Analog_Flash_and_Emergency_Readiness_Act

The American people and the people of the world were told, it’s to everyone’s advantage to have all of this broadcasting done with a digital signal. There is one very big drawback to the digital broadcasting. The television stations are supposed to be early warning stations for the security of the United States. If we come under attack from a foreign nation. The television stations are supposed to the first ones to get the message out to the people, it is their obligation to notify the public. This is an impossible task for them to do with a low signal. You can bet an enemy will be able to scrambled the digital signal. Almost any little thunderstorm that comes by can destroy a digital signal. When a digital signal looses strength it is gone. When the old analog signal looses strength it will still get the message to you, maybe with snow but you get it!

Consider the person waiting to be informed about an enemy attack, or information of a thunderstorm or tornado in their neighborhood. There is a very good chance they will never have access to this information for the simple reason, the television set is sitting quietly with a message on the screen WEAK DIGITAL SIGNAL STRENGTH. The Federal Communications Commission was not considering the public interest when they made this change.

This whole process of analog-to-digital should be revisited. Find out how many super crooks became super rich. Make them come up with the equipment necessary to switch back to analog broadcasting in time of emergency, Or install equipment to make digital broadcasting stronger and more workable during an emergency.

I am sick and tired of looking at a dead TV when a tornado is near! The public has been taken to the cleaners, on one more issue, but this issue is very serious when it comes to decisions between life and death, making it to your basement before the tornado hits. Tornado sirens do not do the job that a TV in every home can do. Many people in recent years have been killed because they failed to hear the tornado siren, just check the news.

https://wordpress.comlghoelson

 

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2 thoughts on “Analog Signal Does Not Die

  1. A better television pictures was the main reason for switching from analog to digital broadcasting. That is what the public was told. We were not told a digital signal can be messed up easily. The further you get away from the tower, the weaker the signal is, consequently people in rural areas were given little or no consideration in the process of the change over. The new digital signal will just quit. The old analog signal would keep on broadcasting the audio portion, the video portion would come through with probably a lot of snow on it but it didn’t completely die.

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